I’d just say to aspiring journalists or writers—who I meet a lot of—do it now. Don’t wait for permission to make something that’s interesting or amusing to you. Just do it now. Don’t wait. Find a story idea, start making it, give yourself a deadline, show it to people who’ll give you notes to make it better. Don’t wait till you’re older, or in some better job than you have now. Don’t wait for anything. Don’t wait till some magical story idea drops into your lap. That’s not where ideas come from. Go looking for an idea and it’ll show up. Begin now. Be a fucking soldier about it and be tough.

Ira Glass
Sunday evening reading with a view.  (at The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston)

Sunday evening reading with a view. (at The First Church of Christ, Scientist, Boston)

David Foster Wallace interview - February '96

In February 1996, David Foster Wallace came to Boston. He was the not-quite recognized writer of the massive book, Infinite Jest, which was just beginning to capture the attention of reviewers, readers and a generation of writers. Chris interviewed David Foster Wallace on The Connection on WBUR in Boston, and told him he seemed to be living in between a moment of cultish obscurity and international artistic celebrity, perhaps even immortality.”

Hurricane Katrina shrank the Black population in New Orleans by 57 percent.

-from Monique W. Morris’ new book Black Stats. Click here for more info on the broad range of fascinating and often surprising facts and figures all about Black life in America. (via thenewpress)

Here are some other statistics from the book:
  • There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools.
  • Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no (<1%) White residents. 
  • In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent.
  • A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political.

(via randomactsofchaos)

Also, read Driven From New Orleans by John Arena. Delves into policy work and how the literal expulsion of people of color, specifically black residents, was made possible post-Hurricane Katrina.

(via lacomeobejas)

(via blackmanonthemoon)

Beautiful afternoon on Harvard’s campus. Look — big bookstores still exist! (at The Harvard Coop)

Beautiful afternoon on Harvard’s campus. Look — big bookstores still exist! (at The Harvard Coop)