'It's like the internet, or cable TV — there's never any center, there's no communal agreement, there's just a trillion little bits of distracting noise. We can never sit down and have any kind of sustained conversation, it's all just cheap trash and shitty development. All the real things, the authentic things, the honest things are dying off. Intellectually and culturally, we just bounce around like random billiard balls, reacting to the latest random stumuli.'

Jonathan Franzen, Freedom
hulu:

Winston teaches us all how to make an entrance in this week’s episode of New Girl.

This makes me regret holding off on watching this episode until tomorrow. Winston, you’re the best. hulu:

Winston teaches us all how to make an entrance in this week’s episode of New Girl.

This makes me regret holding off on watching this episode until tomorrow. Winston, you’re the best.

hulu:

Winston teaches us all how to make an entrance in this week’s episode of New Girl.

This makes me regret holding off on watching this episode until tomorrow. Winston, you’re the best.

For students at the bottom of the income or status distribution, a college degree is crucial to social mobility. A child born to a family in the top fifth, by income, has about a 50 percent chance of earning an above-average income even without a college degree. But a child born at the bottom is likely to stay at the bottom without a college education.

Libby Nelson, “What happens to low-income students on the way to college?

Also interesting to note is how we often imagine low-income, at-risk students to be only in inner-city urban school districts when 1/3 are in rural districts. The difficulty there is access to AP classes, school materials, and teachers who are willing to live in these communities.